22nd July, 2014

sahlineelnagrom asks:

I'm about to start my first year teaching and I was wondering what you would suggest as "must haves" for a middle school ELA classroom. Thank you :) love the blog!

  • sorting trays if that’s your thing
  • Milk crate esque boxes if you plan on kids keeping journals in class
  • binders to organize hard copies of your units
  • index cards—lots.  Good for bell ringers and class closers (post it notes can do this too)
  • A good bulletin board if your room doesn’t have one so expectations/procedures can be posted clearly
  • craft stash: construction paper, markers, crayons, scissors, glue sticks
  • I go through a lot of manila folders.  You can staple them to walls for instant pockets, quickly sort stacks of paper, etc. etc.

22nd July, 2014

I added socket sets, wrenches, and gloves to my wish list because anyone who has ever spent any time in a theater knows how those things grow legs and sprout. =\  

22nd July, 2014

What are the three foods you cannot live without?

allisonunsupervised:

hithertokt:

lairedcake:

lkinkz:

They can be cheat foods. What are your favorites? Eggs are the most important food for me. I don’t know the other two.

Pizza, Eggs, Orange Juice

image

Chocolate, anything with avocado, and frozen treats.

The only definition of a “cheat” food I will accept would be a food that looks delicious and yet is not. 

(via Allison Unsupervised)

22nd July, 2014

Want to support #education? Donate to Tumblr Teachers’ Classrooms!

markct:

positivelypersistentteach:

Dear Tumblrverse,

Before the explanation part of this post, I need to say this so it will be in posts that are shortened by a reblog: More than anything I ask that you reblog this post so that kind millionaires  more people will see it and more support can be given.   All the Amazon wishlists and blogs are linked below the read more link!

As the new school year approaches, we are obviously in denial teachers are mentally figuring out what materials we need for the school year, what will be provided by the school or families, and what we will buy with our own money as we shop sales (if it is in our budget).  Several members of our #education community on tumblr dealt with unexpected family deaths, weather disasters, or more happy (but expensive) life achievements like getting married or having a baby.  Our pockets have been hit hard, and I think you’d be surprised how much of our own money we spend on classrooms each year.

Many of us teach in areas where our students’ families cannot help with school supplies.  In fact, as I began working on this project, every teacher I contacted to include that came from a more affluent community declined being included so that classrooms in greater need could be helped.  I am in awe of the teachers in this community.  After the jump is a list of teachers and their classroom wish lists for the upcoming year.  If you are able to, please consider supporting a teacher via their wishlist.  If you’d rather make a donation to their supply fund or send a gift card, I’m sure you could contact them and they wouldn’t turn you down.   

So after the jump are the blogs and corresponding wishlists from Tumblr’s teachers — most of the educators on this list I have personally interacted with and know them to be dedicated to their students.

Read More

So many thanks for putting this post together PPT!! 

Thank you, PPT, for doing this!

(via Markct)

22nd July, 2014

positivelypersistentteach:

gjmueller:

Coaching parents on toddler talk to address low-income word gap

By age four, toddlers in low-income families hear 30 million fewer words than those in high-income families, according to researchers. As a result, these children tend to have smaller vocabularies and fall behind in reading. Special correspondent John Tulenko of Learning Matters reports on one program in Providence, Rhode Island, that gets low-income parents talking more to their toddlers.

This is so great and important! (I love vocab studies and initiatives).

(via PPT)

22nd July, 2014

(via You Suck, Sir)