1st August, 2012

Indiana is one of the remaining (3?) states to still charge textbook rental fees.  If you qualify for free/reduced lunch, you are exempt from those fees.
But it’s a lot like college:  The fees fluctuate year by year based on how many books/workbooks are needed and how new they are.
The iPads are numbered and assigned to students.  They pay a rental fee each semester, I want to say it’s in the neighborhood of 50 bucks.  However, in order to take the iPad home, students must either purchase insurance on it or prove coverage on their parents renters’ or homeowners’ insurance.  The school now offers insurance for $20 the whole year.  
Last year, students were responsible for protective covers accessories.  The #1 problem with the hardware was cracked screens.  This year, a local business has donated hard “cases” for each student (I don’t know what they look like).  So that’s nice.
I think in the end, out of the nearly 400 students who were issued an iPad, maybe 10 didn’t have take-home privileges.  And it’s not like they were denied. The principal solicited donations from his friends and his own graduating class (he’s alumni) to cover the cost of an insurance policy for any kid who didn’t have one.  I heard those kids just didn’t care to take one home.
If a kid didn’t turn in the iPad it would be just like a textbook.  A fee would be charged to replace it and if it’s not paid then the corp takes the family to small claims court.  I don’t recall any issues with them not being turned in at the end of the year.  (It was done early in the last week of school.)  
Then, each iPad is inspected, updated, wiped clean, installed with needed/approved apps, and then reissued to the same student.  They can reinstall any apps they downloaded themselves because of the Cloud.  
At the end of their senior year, the plan is the student will “buy” the iPad for a buck.  
(For the record:  Teachers have them too.  I got to keep mine through the summer.  It’s white; the students’ are black.)  

Indiana is one of the remaining (3?) states to still charge textbook rental fees.  If you qualify for free/reduced lunch, you are exempt from those fees.

But it’s a lot like college:  The fees fluctuate year by year based on how many books/workbooks are needed and how new they are.

The iPads are numbered and assigned to students.  They pay a rental fee each semester, I want to say it’s in the neighborhood of 50 bucks.  However, in order to take the iPad home, students must either purchase insurance on it or prove coverage on their parents renters’ or homeowners’ insurance.  The school now offers insurance for $20 the whole year.  

Last year, students were responsible for protective covers accessories.  The #1 problem with the hardware was cracked screens.  This year, a local business has donated hard “cases” for each student (I don’t know what they look like).  So that’s nice.

I think in the end, out of the nearly 400 students who were issued an iPad, maybe 10 didn’t have take-home privileges.  And it’s not like they were denied. The principal solicited donations from his friends and his own graduating class (he’s alumni) to cover the cost of an insurance policy for any kid who didn’t have one.  I heard those kids just didn’t care to take one home.

If a kid didn’t turn in the iPad it would be just like a textbook.  A fee would be charged to replace it and if it’s not paid then the corp takes the family to small claims court.  I don’t recall any issues with them not being turned in at the end of the year.  (It was done early in the last week of school.)  

Then, each iPad is inspected, updated, wiped clean, installed with needed/approved apps, and then reissued to the same student.  They can reinstall any apps they downloaded themselves because of the Cloud.  

At the end of their senior year, the plan is the student will “buy” the iPad for a buck.  

(For the record:  Teachers have them too.  I got to keep mine through the summer.  It’s white; the students’ are black.)  

Notes

  1. tomes-away said: okay, follow-ups: what educational apps (if any) do you use in class, do you download novels/scripts to the iPad to save on book costs, and how do you use them usefully every day so they’re not just for Angry Birds or iMessage?
  2. girlwithalessonplan posted this